Everything is beautiful in its season

Yesterday, I took down the bunting plastered with faces of my sister. She moved from the U.S. to the U.K. to go to school one week ago on Sunday, and I figured it was time to take down her going-away-party decorations. Check out her blog for funny observations of UK culture and lessons she learns on her latest adventure!

She made this herself. No lack of self-esteem and I love it!
She made this herself. No lack of self-esteem and I love it!

The day that she left, I shed a few tears after leaving the airport and then went home and finished reading a novel I began at the beginning of summer.

I received this novel for my birthday in May and 600 odd pages later finished it in September. Moving in June and having 2 toddlers has slowed my reading pace down a bit.
I received this novel for my birthday in May and 600 odd pages later finished it in September. Moving in June and having 2 toddlers has slowed my reading pace down a bit.

After finishing the novel, I began to think about the natural season change from summer to fall as well as all the external changes going on in life.

T. S. Eliot writes in the Four Quartets, 

What we call the beginning is often the end

And to make an end is to make a beginning.

The end is where we start from.

One of the hardest things in life is beginning and finishing a season well. It’s so easy to be consumed with what’s coming ahead that we forget to live fully in the present. I think one of the worst things in the world is not embracing the time, place, and people of your season.

I think the best time to eat fresh peaches is when they're in season and at their peak. Peaches bought at a grocery store in the middle of winter are nothing compared to ones freshly picked in season. I think this is what we're meant to do with the season we're in - embrace it for everything it is and once it's gone embrace what's beautiful in the new.
I think the best time to eat fresh peaches is when they’re in season and at their peak. Peaches bought at a grocery store in the middle of winter are nothing compared to ones freshly picked in season. I think this is what we’re meant to do with the season we’re in – embrace it for everything it is and once it’s gone embrace what’s beautiful in the new.

Over the past 10 years I’ve made a handful of significant moves. After or during each move, people inevitably ask if I miss the place I left. I’ve come to realize that up until the day I actually leave a place, I love every moment and bit of it. As Eliot so eloquently puts it, “what we call the beginning is often the end.” I think it’s because this is SO true that I often feel bittersweet in every sense of the word when one season comes to an end and another one begins.

Proverbs 10:5 says,

know the importance of the season you’re in
and a wise person you will be.”

Big life events often mark big season changes, but even the small season changes are important to be aware of because time can slip through our fingers without us even being aware of what’s happened or why we’re in the place we find ourselves.

As autumn truly begins these next few weeks, I can’t wait to think and pray about this next season and its importance. Here’s to beginnings and endings and everything in between!

Happy fall, friends!
Happy fall, friends!
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