Winter: a time to throw away and a time to gather

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A good beginning is half the work.

(Old Irish Proverb)

Happy New Year, friends! How do you approach your new year? Do you set goals? Make resolutions? Come up with a word for the year?

Winter, especially the first month of the year, is all about bringing things into fresh focus. The snowy landscape even reflects this in the way you can see a tree’s actual form and shape without the covering of leaves. Everything in nature becomes more obvious against the backdrop of white snow and bright skies. The clarity is refreshing.

It is winter proper; the cold weather, such as it is, has come to stay. I bloom indoors in the winter like a forced forsythia; I come in to come out. At night I read and write, and things become clear; I reap the harvest of the rest of the year’s planting.

(Annie Dillard)

Mentally, most of us use this time of year to prioritize and plan. The cold days and long nights seem to provide more opportunity to take stock of how we spend our time and allows us to alter and adjust for the year ahead. For some this means doing a health cleanse or detox. For others it looks like committing to a budget. And for others, it’s simply taking the inspiration to change a habit and making a commitment to do certain things differently.

All change begins with removing the old, the stuff that doesn’t work, the dusty unused things, the bad habits and practices and replacing them with the new, the new gifts, the useful and helpful things, and fresh habits and practices for a new season.

These cold months provide a time to throw away material clutter and to gather fresh organization. It’s a time to throw away negative mindsets and habits and to gather positive attitudes and practices. It’s a time to throw away striving and comparison and to gather contentment and confidence. This snowy, cold season strips everything down to the most essential, the core, the heart and gives us fresh eyes to see what matters most. It blows in winds of inspiration that lead to transformation.

For me personally, this looks like going through my day and making small adjustments where I feel led to change. Life with a newborn can be a challenging season with sleep deprivation and learning a new rhythm, but there have been a handful of things I’ve felt convicted to change in the midst of this transition.

In spending habits: to purchase with the environment and the local economy in mind

(think beeswax wrap over plastic wrap and local stores over Amazon)

In health: to move two times a week (think walks in the woods and yoga with Adriene) and eating a vegetable with every meal

In parenting: to value presence over productivity — this one is especially difficult for my type A personality, but it’s something I’m keeping top of mind with the time I spend with my kids

In relationships: to encourage and reach out more often — as someone who doesn’t mind going days without connecting with friends this looks like being more intentional with being the one to send a text or message rather than the one who always receives

Within each of these areas there are things that need to be thrown away in order to gather the new intentions and make them a reality. If you haven’t yet taken time to reflect about this new year, take some time this week and ask yourself what habits, thought patterns, or things need to be thrown away in order for you to gather some healthy, fresh ones. Don’t feel pressure to start big, rather think of something achievable and maintainable and go with that.

Watch, now, how I start the day

in happiness, in kindness.

(Mary Oliver)

It’s easy to lament the lack of sleep during this season and the challenge to wake up each morning with a song rather than a complaint is intense, but so worth the effort. Psalm 59:16 says, “but I will sing of your strength and will joyfully proclaim your faithful love in the morning.” This has been top of mind as each day begins with the opening of the curtains. I’ve created a bright and restful playlist on Spotify called Winter Wonder 2018 if you need something to listen to this season.

Click here to find listen.

I pray this is a time where you are able to throw away those things that have become hindrances in your life so you are able to gather the things you feel rising in your heart to do. Letting go of the old to grasp onto the new can be difficult, but God’s grace is sufficient and His mercies are new every morning so don’t feel disheartened when you stumble a little. As Scarlett O’Hara famously said, “after all, tomorrow is another day!”

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Still Small Moments the book

I am thrilled to announce the publication of my first book! About two years ago I started writing and it’s being released on September 17! As a new mom, I found it difficult to figure out how to be honest and vulnerable about difficult parenting moments while also recognizing the joyful moments and fully embracing the season for what it is. My book, Still Small Moments, is all about finding miracle in the mundane and having the best perspective for life’s challenges and celebrations regardless of the season.

I would so appreciate your support during the launch period. Here are some of the things you can do to help:

Pre-order the book now or purchase it the week of the launch (preferably from Unprecedented Press’ website because Amazon takes a big chunk of the profit)

Subscribe to the mailing list for updates about the book. Here. Review the book on Amazon (It’s all about those stars!)

Tell people about the book: in person and on social media

Thank you so much for all your love and support!

“Cultivating peace in the process produces rest for the journey.”

Rhythm series: rest

Ever since I can remember I have been a planner. Sometimes to a fault. You know those kids in school who write everything down in their agenda? The adults who buy all the stationary goods?  Love or despise planning, natural skill or not, paper or phone, figuring out a way to set rhythms for our lives is essential to living an intentional and purposeful life. Annie Dillard said it best: “How we spend our days is, of course how we spend our lives.”

There are certain seasons when it feels like the things we spend our days on are not important. Seasons when everything feels mundane and unimportant. And then there are seasons when it feels like the train is barreling down the tracks so fast that it won’t stop and you can’t get off. Seasons when everything feels urgent and important.


In this rhythm series, I hope to pass along some keys I’ve learned that establish rhythms that work for your life. Before diving into the nitty gritty details of schedules and planning, this post’s focus is rest.

It really is senseless to work so hard from early morning till late at night, toiling to make a living for fear of not having enough. God can provide for His lovers, even while they sleep. (Psalm 127:2, The Passion Translation)

In our lives there will always be a time to work and a time to rest. If we don’t give ourselves permission to rest, the fear of lack and scarcity will rule our choices and decisions and our actions become frantic and aimless. It could be fear of lack in any area of life that prevents rest; scarcity in finance, relationships, time, opportunities, and a hundred and one other things that can keep you up at night.


Things in life produce and grow when given periods of rest. Bread dough bubbles up and rises with rest. Soil is most nutritious when given a break every few years. The muscles in our bodies heal and grow with recovery time. I’ve been guilty of striving and toiling and things get ugly quickly – small stresses and annoyances suddenly become a huge deal.

Rest is a space cushion, that safe distance between your car and the cars around you, in our lives keeping us safe and giving us room for movement. It’s the margin that allows for flexibility and overflow.

Here are some keys to establishing rhythms of rest:

  • Figure out what brings you rest
  • Find ways to gracefully say “no”
  • Disconnect: turn the phone on airplane mode or off
  • Do one thing restful everyday (even if it’s only 15 minutes)
  • Plan one extended restful activity once a week (could be half a day or a whole day depending on your season in life

Figuring out what brings you rest can be tricky. Resting is different than crashing; it’s intentional not mindless. Maybe it’s taking a walk, reading a book for pleasure, listening to music without doing anything else, going to an art gallery, running, journaling, browsing the aisles of your favorite store, road tripping, taking a bath.

Regardless of everything else going on in your life, set time aside each day and once a week that is sacred and immovable to rest. In the beginning of creation the need for rest was established – we are at our best in every other area of life when this is a rhythm in our lives.


If you want to dive deeper into this topic here are some good resources:

Rhythms of Rest by Shelley Miller

Chasing Slow by Erin Loechner

Crazy Busy by Kevin DeYoung

Deep Work by Cal Newport

In Praise of Slowness TED talk 

The Art of Stillness TED talk